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Hereditary Cancer Risk Analysis

Hereditary Cancer Risk Analysis

Description

Overview
Documentation
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An accurate and safe genetic test to determine a healthy adult’s genetic risks for cancer.

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Overview

Did you know that Cancer can be Inherited?

Cancer is the second leading cause of death globally. Most cancers are “sporadic,” or seemingly due to random chance and without an identifiable cause. But about 5-10% of certain cancers are due to harmful genetic changes, called mutations, that are passed down through families.¹ These people have a higher risk of developing the disease than those in the general public. For example, a BRCA1 mutation can increase a woman’s chance of breast cancer up to 87% by age 70.2

Early cancer detection improves survival rates.3,4

Genes tested:

GGA Hereditary Cancer Risk Analysis tests 25 genes associated with cancer. These genes are recognized by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) as medically actionable.

Why you should know your risk?

  • Discover your genetic risk of a particular disease for early prevention and treatment.
  • Early detection improves cancer outcome.
  • Get to know your risk to your children.
  • Provide information to guide your health care.

Who should take this test?

  • Adults (>18 years old) who would like to understand their risk.
  • Adults with family history of cancer.

 

Test Process

Documentation

Brochure

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Personal Genetic Databank

GGA provides different genetic tests according to different categories. You could upgrade your testing package to discover your cardiometabolic risk and check if you are a carrier for certain genetic conditions that may pass onto your offspring (Expanded Carrier Screening).

References:

  1. Pharm Res. 2008 Sep; 25(9): 2097–2116.
  2. Lancet. 1994 343:692-5. PMID: 7907678.
  3. www.cancer.org/cancer/ovarian-cancer/detection-diagnosis-staging/survival-rates.html
  4. www.cancer.org/cancer/breast-cancer/understanding-a-breast-cancer-diagnosis/breast-cancer-survival-rates.html